Wittle Baby Cable Hat

I found this adorable cable baby hat pattern a few months ago.  Ravelry and Pinterest are my new addictions – any time I find myself with a spare minute/hour, I’m on one or the other.  This hat caught my eye because the photo was a super cute baby (see???) and the pattern seemed relatively simple enough for my novice knitting skills.  You can easily access it here.

I got really excited when I discovered this pattern used fingering weight yarn.  Not that I was actually excited to knit with what basically ends up being skewers and string, but that I had recently spent an inordinate amount of money buying almost every colorway of Lion Brand Cone Wool yarn – a “100% virgin wool” that came in something like 2000 yards for $20.  It was a steal in my book – until it came in the mail and I saw just exactly how thin ‘fingering’ weight yarn is.  Whoops.

Anyway, since I have no plans to spend my days knitting socks (because I am just not that good, nor am I dedicated enough to spend entire weeks of my life to items of clothing that will just get stinky and have to be washed after every wear), this pattern was interesting to me also because it promised to ‘grow’ with the baby.  What does that mean?  Well dear readers, let me introduce to you a Quick Lesson on Baby Heads.

Having never given birth myself, I always just assumed that baby heads grew at a proportional rate of the rest of the body – comes out tiny (usually about 12 inches around), a little bit the first year, a little more the second year, etc.  I had measured enough adult heads to figure the average to be aboooout 22 inches.  Imagine my surprise, then, when four years ago when I first started making hats, my coworker wanted one for her 12 month old, and measured her little skull to be 19 inches around.  19????  We were both boggled.  Surely it’s not possible for such a tiny creature to have a head that’s 85% of an adult.  No WONDER they have such a hard time rolling over and lifting that noggin up, learning how to stand, walk, etc.  That is some serious topweight these little tykes are carrying around.

(Another fun trick: have you ever lifted your arms above your head?  Yes you, lift them up and see how far they reach. The top of your head comes to about your elbows, right?  Now try it on a baby.  Go ahead.  Now chortle with amusement.)

Anyhoo, given the approximate EIGHT inches in diameter that a baby’s head grows in the first year, I end up having to be really specific about my hat patterns regarding how old the baby will be/season of the year/whether it’ll fit, etc.  Depending on the pattern, I sometimes end up having to make four sizes for a baby’s first year.  Here is where knitting has the upper hand – it’s sooper stretchy and therefore very forgiving.

When I *finally* finished the hat, I was pleasantly surprised.  It grew just like it promised it would, looked cute on a small head AND didn’t look ridiculous on a bigger one!  So excited was I, that I promptly made two more.  Well, by promptly I mean, slowly over the course of two weeks, but whatevs.  Here they are!

cable3

See?  Amazingly stretchy just as promised!  The green head size is about a 0-3 month old.  The Hat of Many Colors is on a 12 month old.  It’s magic!!

cable2

Crochet vs. Knit: Which do YOU prefer?

As the title of this blog implies, I am, by heart, a crocheter.  I learned how to crochet when I was a kid.  I’ve spent countless hours teaching myself new tricks and stitches and feel pretty comfortable saying that I am fairly advanced.  That being said, the world of knitting had always loomed (ooh look! a pun!) mysterious in front of me – for some reason knitters always used that fancy expensive yarn you had to wind yourself (which I still really don’t understand – if I’m going to pay a 400% markup from the ‘craft store’ yarn, can’t you just freakin put it in a ball for me??), their projects always involved CLOTHES, something that, unless you wanted to drape yourself in granny squares, crocheters really just don’t do.  I came up with the title of “classy” crochet because my motto when I started was “just because you CAN, doesn’t mean you should.”

I just had to. I mean, really. It’s amazing.

Knitting always seemed the more ‘sophisticated’ of the two, and certainly more people know how to knit than crochet.  When people hear you knit, they nod their head.  Nobody ever asks “so what’s the difference between knitting and crocheting?” When people hear you crochet, they always, always ask how it’s different from knitting (not that they understand one word of your yarn terminology), and at some point there always comes some joke about crotches and old ladies.  It’s just inappropriate.

So, finally, tired of being informed that I wasn’t good at my craft because I didn’t know how to do a different one, I decided to tackle the seemingly insurmountable.  I was REALLY going to learn how to knit.  I had tried several times before with 100% failure rate.  But, we got stuck in D.C. with no visas to China and our things had already been packed up and literally put on a slow boat, and there I was, trapped in a hotel room for three weeks.  So… I learned how to knit, very laboriously.  I have since picked up on several tips and tricks (and I worship the magical soothing voice of whomever runs the videos on knittinghelp.com) and can say that I now understand the need for ‘nicer’ yarn when knitting.  Consequently, my yarn expenditures have trebled this year (but don’t tell my husband, he doesn’t technically know).

That being said, when I now semi-triumphantly tell people I can do both, I don’t get the appreciative That’s so cool! that I was hoping for.  Rather, I now get the repetitive demanding response of So which is better?  Well… as in all arguments, the answer is always going to be:  “It depends.”  In my long years of crocheting, and my short not-quite-year of knitting, here is my run down.  Let the great debate begin!

Technique

Crochet Knit
ONE active loop!  This means that at any given time, at any given point in your project, you only have to worry about ONE loop that might come undone.  This means if you want to start a new project, just yank your hook out, stretch out that one loop, and your project can sit for months, peacefully, undisturbed. VS The hardest concept of knitting for me to grasp was “live stitches”.  You mean, ALL of the length of my project has to be on a needle THE ENTIRE TIME??? This seemed very tedious and arduous to me.  And really stressful – what happened to the one hook to rule them all?  What happens when you want to start a different project with said needles and don’t feel like finishing the one you’ve got on (yet)?  I ended up buying several different sets, lengths, widths of needles before I finally sucked it up and bought an interchangeable set.  Seriously, they need to tell you these things right off the bat.
One hook.  With a HOOK on the end.  This means if you drop said hook, or you accidentally yank on your project, the worst that happens is a few stitches come undone and you pick it up  and redo the stitches.  When I did something wrong, the saving grace of crochet was that I could simply rip it back to the mistake, insert my hook, and start over again. VS omg. If I had to say the one thing that made me want to fling knitting across the room, it’s the process of fixing mistakes.  And with needles with no hooks and hundreds of slippery, live stitches, mistakes abound when you’re a newbie.  What happens when you make one?  Well… you can slip your needles out, and insert them back in. one. stitch. at. a. time. (of course, making sure to twist them the right way while you do it), all the while hoping and praying that the stitch (which is connected to the next stitch) doesn’t get too loose and (gasp) slips down to the row below.  Just writing this stresses me out.
Finishing: when you’re done, you’re done.  You take your hook out, slip your yarn through, and weave your end in.  The end. VS You have to cast off an entire row of stitches.  This means if you’ve carefully counted equal rows of x vs. y, and didn’t factor in your cast off row, you’re out of luck.  Or even better, calculated *just* enough yarn to finish your project… and then ran out when you had to cast off.  Yep, that’s happened.
Hats: Since I started my crochet ‘career’ with hats, it is my main focus in both crochet and knitting.  With crochet, you start from the top down.  This means you start small and work big.  You can decide on the length and add/subtract rows accordingly.  If it’s too big or small – rip it out and do it again. VS With knitting, you start at the brim and work your way up.  This means you’d better have calculated your width exactly right from the beginning, otherwise there’s no way to fix it.  And then when you get to the top?  Every time I pull out my DPNs my husband winces and says “that looks dangerous”.  It is – I’ve poked myself in the eye with stray needles more times than I can count.

Summary: when it comes to the actual technique of crochet vs. knitting, crochet wins, hands down, any day, every day.  Also, I’ve discovered it’s much easier to crochet small, freeform objects (such as stuffed animals, appliques and whatnot) than it is to knit.  There are just. so. many. needles.

Yarn

Crochet Knit
This is where I can go either way.  Crocheting uses up a LOT of yarn.  Plus, the stitches are usually pretty thick and several times the actual width of the yarn.  Therefore, buying really expensive, nice yarn to crochet with is kind of a waste of money, because 1) you need so much of it and 2) the quality is mostly lost in the texture of the crochet.  So, if you really want to be frugal, buying cheap yarn and crocheting it away is a good way to go.  (Note: I own almost all cheap yarn.  And by all I mean… I own a large portion of the cheap yarn in ze world). VS I will say, finally having worthy projects to use the occasional ball of alpaca I had saved up was really nice.  Nobody admires a crocheted alpaca hat.  The drape and more sheer texture of knitted fabric really showcases high quality fibers.  That being said, you kind of almost have to have ‘really nice yarn’ when you knit.  Spending all that time and effort to create something that’s lumpy and scratchy (something that gets covered up in crochet) at the end of the day isn’t worth it.  Also: NEVER knit with Red Heart Super Saver.  EVER.

Summary: if you want to stick with cheap yarn, crochet it all away!  Also, crocheting tends to hold up better if you want to chuck things in the machine vs ‘buy expensive delicate wool washes and soak by hand’.  Or, when you knit, buy the wool/acrylic blend.  Baby schtuff = machine washable.  A must.  I don’t understand these women that are like “oh, I knit this sweater for my infant niece out of 100% cashmere alpaca blend, it’s so soft”.  And then when the baby pukes on it, what is the mom supposed to do?  Does she really want to spend time soaking it, swirling it, rolling it gently up in a towel to blot out extra water, and then carefully lay it out to dry, rearranging the shape of the sweater so it doesn’t warp?  If you are that mom, I tip my hat to you.  Kudos, props, gold star.

Projects

Crochet Knit
Crocheting has its pros and cons with projects, but I have to say, the things you can make are limited.  Baby hats can be ADORABLE.  Afghans are super easy (probably because you don’t have to haul a 56″ cable needle to knit one with).  For the last three years I’ve found cute womens’ crocheted accessories in stylish (read: expensive) boutique and chain stores. But mens’ hats?  I’ve seriously struggled.  Clothing?  I can’t say that I’ve found a single piece of crocheted adult clothing that I would ever actually wear.  No wait that’s a lie.  I found a bolero once at Forever 21, but the time it would have taken me to recreate it wasn’t worth the $12.99 I could have spent just to buy it. VS This is where I have to say that knitting wins, no doubt about it.  It is a much more versatile skill.  As before mentioned, you can actually knit CLOTHES that people might actually put upon their (or their childrens’) bodies.  I’ve discovered a whole new world of manly mens’ hats.  Knitting is much more stretchy, so hats for babies are much more forgiving. This means I only have to knit one hat for every three (in different sizes) for a baby.  Score!

Summary: knitting takes home the prize for actual versatility of projects.  HowEVER… having said that, I have to mention the following: I’ve spent all of my time trying to create products that are professional looking and something that you could possibly ‘buy in a store’, if that makes sense.  Classy stuff, right?  I’ve crocheted hats and scarves, knit hats and scarves and cowls, and worn all of them out and about.  Here’s the kicker: while I’ve received countless positive compliments about my crocheted things, I have not once ever gotten any feedback about my knitted ones.  Zero.  Not even a “oh did you make that yourself?  Cool.”  Knitted things look nicer because they look like something you would have bought from a store, and therefore apparently when you knit it nicely enough, people assume you did buy it from a store, or better yet, from the lady on the street selling dusty, dirty hats spread out on the sidewalk for $2 each.  Right now, it’s freezing in Beijing and the little Chinese girls are all traipsing about with the most awesome collection of crazy colored knit hats.  I look at them every day and wonder if I can recreate them, but then is it worth it to spend all that time to have someone think that I picked it up in the market for $1?

Additionally, I’m having a hard time reconciling myself with “knitted looks nice” and “there is not a single item of adult clothing I would ever knit that would be more worth it to me than buying something tailored from Banana Republic on clearance for $19.99.”

SO.  Now that I’ve debated the merits of knit vs. crochet to death, which one do you prefer????

Free Pattern: Diamond Lattice Chain Crochet Infinity Scarf

6/13/2013 UPDATE:

MY FRIENDS!  Thank you for coming by to visit this post!  When I peruse my stats (because I am a statistician, that is what I do), this post always has a bazillion people clicking every day.  I sincerely hope you are all chaining your way to awesome scarves.

That being said, yesterday I stumbled across a free pattern from the always awesome, always famous The Lovely Crow on a “Genius Headband“.  When I clicked on it, I discovered that 1) it was pretty much the same lattice pattern as below, but 2) it has a WAY BETTER finishing technique than mine.  I read the instructions and already I could tell that it creates a seamless, awesome finish instead of the weird lumpy row I was improvising.

So, that being said, please feel free to visit Ravelry and download the pattern yourself for reference.  You’ll need an account, but I have a feeling most of you came here from Ravelry in the first place anyway.  😛  Good luck!

*Start original scarf post*

This is my most used go-to scarf pattern.  I love it because 1) it’s super easy, 2) it’s super fast, and 3) it’s super yarn/budget friendly.  I mean, with all these incredible bonuses working in its favor, how can you *not* be inspired to grab a skein (and a half) of bulky yarn and whip one out too?

Diamond Lattice Crochet Scarf Pattern | Classy Crochet

This scarf is great because the bulky yarn and extra long length keeps you super warm, but the open lattice work keeps you from smothering to death.  This is very important because there is simply nothing worse than being simultaneously freezing when it’s cold out, yet having sweat dripping down your chest and feeling like you’re about to choke.  Not that I speak from personal experience.

My favorite bulky yarn is Lion Brand Wool Ease Thick n Quick.  It comes in a variety of really great colors (my personal favorites are citron and lemongrass), it’s that so-helpful blend of acrylic and wool which means it’s cozy and warm like wool but non-scratchy and most importantly machine washable like acrylic, and you can find it everywhere online and in stores and usually for a great deal too.

I can’t even remember which hook I normally use – K, L, or M all work with this pattern.  There’s no gauge, no swatch, no important notes to reference.  And all you have to do is know how to chain.  Wha-?  That’s right, this is tooootally a beginner’s scarf.

Let’s begin!

Diamond Lattice Crochet Scarf Pattern | Classy CrochetWith your hook and yarn, ch 30

Diamond Lattice Crochet Scarf Pattern | Classy Crochet

Row 1: Slip stitch into the 10th chain from the hook.  Ch5, count every 5 chains, slip stitch, repeat to the end.

Diamond Lattice Crochet Scarf Pattern | Classy Crochet

Row 2: ch5, turn, and slip stitch into the middle of the ch5 loop (or third ch).  Repeat: ch5 and slip stitch into the middle chain of each loop.

Diamond Lattice Crochet Scarf Pattern | Classy Crochet

End of row 2.  Ch5, turn, and repeat.  Chain chain chain away until scarf is desired length.

Diamond Lattice Crochet Scarf Pattern | Classy Crochet

I usually make this hat with 60-75% of one skein of Lion Brand Thick n Quick, and use the rest and an additional skein to complete the scarf.  It makes the perfect length, AND it’s budget friendly.  (Who would have thought you could get a nice crocheted hat AND a really long scarf out of only two skeins of bulky yarn?!)  When you reach the length you want, flip the scarf over…

Diamond Lattice Crochet Scarf Pattern | Classy Crochet

…and line up the other edge.  You can either make a loop, or twist it once for a ‘mobius’ effect.  Starting from the blue arrow, insert your hook and sl st both sides together.

Diamond Lattice Crochet Scarf Pattern | Classy Crochet

…like so.  Ch3, then sl st into the top of both loops (the right white arrow on the previous photo).  Ch5, sl st into two loops four times.  Ch3, sl st into both loops at the end (last white arrow on the left).

Diamond Lattice Crochet Scarf Pattern | Classy Crochet

Your finished edge will look like this.  It looks like just another row.

Diamond Lattice Crochet Scarf Pattern | Classy Crochet

It will leave a bit of a bumpy ridge when you lay it flat, but I’ve never had anyone complain about it, and it’s barely noticeable when you put it on.

Diamond Lattice Crochet Scarf Pattern | Classy Crochet

Loop that sucker around your neck and go conquer the world!

11/23/2013: Final addendum.  I’ve had several people ask (very nicely) if they could sell scarves made from this pattern.  Please, feel free.  If you’ve put the time into it, you should reap whatever benefits you want.  I humbly request a link or acknowledgement of some kind to this post, but otherwise, chain away to your heart’s (profitable) content.  Thanks!!

How to… Chainless Foundation

Today we’re learning how to make a double crochet chainless foundation.  Once you learn it you’ll be hard pressed to go back to ye old “chain 82, turn and dc into third ch from hook” etc.  Have you found that the first row always ends up being tighter and more puckered than the rest?  So lame.  The chainless foundation 1) gets rid of that tighter first row, and 2) creates the first row of stitches as you go along.  This is also particularly awesome because if you get to the end and decide meh, too short or dang, too long, you just add or rip out a few stitches.  Instead of ripping. out. all. the. way. back. to. the. beginning.  You get the point.

Chainless Foundation Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 1: ch3.  My dcs are 2 ch high.  If yours are 3ch high, ch4.

Chainless Foundation Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 2: yo, insert hook into first two loops of the first ch.  This seems a little weird at first, but I promise you it’s correct.

Chainless Foundation Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 3: Bring hook through loops.  3 loops on hook.

Chainless Foundation Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 4: Yo, draw hook through the first loop.  You’ll still have 3 loops on hook.

Chainless Foundation Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 5: Yo, draw hook through two loops.  2 loops remaining on hook.

Chainless Foundation Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 6: Yo, draw hook through remaining two loops.  Completed first dc.

It can be a smidge confusing seeing all this in one color, so just for demonstration purposes I’m switching to a different color to show how you continue the chainless foundation:

Chainless Foundation Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 1: Yo, insert hook into bottom two loops of the stitch before.  This creates the look of a ch foundation on the bottom.

Chainless Foundation Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 2: Yo…

Chainless Foundation Tutorial | Classy Crochet

…and draw the hook through.  Again, you’ll have 3 loops on your hook.

Chainless Foundation Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 4: Yo, draw hook through first loop.  3 loops on hook.

Chainless Foundation Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 5: Yo, draw hook through two loops.  2 loops remaining on hook.

Chainless Foundation Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 6: Yo, draw hook through remaining loops.  Completed chainless dc.

Chainless Foundation Tutorial | Classy Crochet

A quick tip!!  When drawing the first loop through, I like to stretch it out quite a bit.  Otherwise, the first time I tried it, my bottom row ended up being quite tight and I still got that dreaded ch row pucker…

Chainless Foundation Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Pucker.  No good.

Chainless Foundation Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Looser bottom.  Very good.  You’ll notice your stitches are a bit slanted as you first start – just tug on them a little as you go and they’ll straighten right out.

Congratulations!  You’ve mastered the chainless foundation.  Your crocheting will never be the same again!

How to: Back Post Double Crochet (BPDC)

Back Post Double Crochet (BPDC) was a bit complicated for me to pick up at first, but now that I’ve got it down, it’s just as easy as FPDC.  The trick is inserting your hook the right way into the stitch below.

For demonstration purposes I’m using a contrasting color so you can see what’s going on.

You always begin fpdc or bpdc with a foundation row of dc first.

Back Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 1: The white arrows are pointing to the ‘stitch below’ that into which we will be inserting our hook.  The red arrow shows the top stitches that you would normally dc into (yes, I’m technically skipping a stitch, it’s just easier to demonstrate).

Back Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

This photo is from the FPDC tutorial.  Do you see how your hook goes through the stitch below, right to left?

Back Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 2: For BPDC, your hook goes through the back of the stitch below, right to left.

Back Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

I have flipped my piece over so you can see how the hook goes through the back.
Back Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 3: From here it’s just like dc or FPDC: yo…

Back Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 4: Draw loop through the stitch below (3 loops on hook)

Back Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 5: Yo again…

Back Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Step 6: Draw through 2 loops, then yo and draw through remaining loops

Back Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Flipping the piece back over to the right side, you can see the finished BPDC.  It’s about half the height of a regular dc and you can see where the yarn wraps around the stitch below.

Back Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

If you were to crochet an entire row of BPDC, it would look something like this.  However, it’s almost always used in conjunction with FPDC.

Back Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy CrochetThis is how a FPDC, BPDC row of ‘ribs’ looks.  I usually repeat it for total of three or four rows for a nice ribbed edge.

Again, the trickiest part is getting step 2 down.  Once you get that, the rest is easy.  Here’s a great video I found online if you want to see it in action.  The lovely narrator has an Australian accent – always a bonus when learning things online.  🙂  Enjoy!

How to: Quick Rosette Flower

Here’a super simple pattern for a rosette crochet flower.  They’re cute and really fast to make, and add a classic or whimsical touch to your finished projects.  You can use any weight yarn and any size hook.  For this tutorial I’m using regular worsted weight yarn and a size I (5.5mm) hook.

This pattern is SUPER adaptable.  Chain any length you want for a bigger flower, go up a hook size, etc.  The sky’s the limit!

Rosette Crochet Flower Tutorial | Classy Crochet

ch25

Rosette Crochet Flower Tutorial | Classy Crochet

The basic premise is, you’ll be crocheting two stitches into each chain. I like to start off smaller, so 2 hdc into the next three ch, then I switch up to 2 dc into each of the next 8 or so ch. If you want to go wild, you can increase even more to 2 tdc into the next 5 ch, then back down to 2 dc for the next 8 ch, then back down to 2 hdc for the last two chs. Your project will curl around like so. Fasten off, leaving long tail to stitch the flower together and attach to projects.

Rosette Crochet Flower Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Arrange your curl around so it looks like a nice rosette.

Rosette Crochet Flower Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Using long tail, stitch the rosette into place. I like to make sure my stitches go through the foundation ch on each layer (white arrows) so the petals are secure. Fasten off with a long chain to sew onto project.

Rosette Crochet Flower Tutorial | Classy Crochet

If you use 100% wool to make the rosette, they felt up beautifully. You can attach a 1″ pin or 1″ French clip on the back to fasten to projects.

And that’s it!  Awesome flower, done in no time, very versatile… what more could you ask for?

How to: Front Post Double Crochet (FPDC)

Today we’re going to learn how to make a front post double crochet, or FPDC.  It seemed sooooo intimidating to me back in my early crochet days, but honestly it’s so simple I don’t know why I stressed so much about it.  Do you know how to double crochet?  Then you know how to FPDC. FPDC (in conjunction with BPDC) makes great ribs and texture in your crochet projects.  I often like to throw it in at the end of a hat for a nice ribbed brim.  The photos below show a FPDC in the round, but it’s all the same.

For demonstration purposes I’m using a contrasting color so you can see what’s going on.

Front Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Ch2 at beginning of row, YO

Front Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Insert hook through post of corresponding stitch below.

Front Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

YO

Front Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Draw hook through (3 loops)

Front Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

YO

Front Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Draw hook through 2 loops

Front Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

YO, draw hook through remaining 2 loops

Front Post Double Crochet Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Completed FPDC

See, wasn’t that easy?  Basically you’re just making a dc, but instead of into the top two stitches of the row below, you’re sticking your hook AROUND the actual stitch.  It’s awesome.  Grab your hook and go!

How to: Basic Crochet Flower

I’ve been making this flower forEVER and have done a zillion variations on it – hook size, number of stitches per petal, number of petals per flower, etc.  It’s extremely versatile and is fantastic for a last minute embellishment on any of your awesome yarn accessories.  You can sew it directly onto your project, or I have also lined the back with a felt circle and French clip for a removable accessory.  The possibilities are endless!

For this tutorial I’m using just a basic worsted weight yarn and a size I hook.

Basic Crochet Flower Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Row 1: ch4, sl st to form a loop. *ch3, sl st into loop* repeat 5 times for a total of six ch3 loops. This forms the basis for your first row of petals.

Basic Crochet Flower Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Row 2: Sl st, ch1 into first ch3 loop. In each loop: hdc, dc, hdc, ch1, sl st. Sl st, ch1 into next loop and repeat.

Basic Crochet Flower Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Finished first round of petals.

Basic Crochet Flower Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Row 3: ch1, turn flower over. *Insert hook, sl st into middle of the back of the petal. Ch4.* Repeat * five times – 6 ch4 loops.

Basic Crochet Flower Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Finished row 3. The ch4 loops provide the base of the next row of petals.

Basic Crochet Flower Tutorial | Classy Crochet

Row 4: Sl st, ch1 into first ch4 loop. In each loop: hdc, 3 dc, hdc, ch1, sl st. Sl st, ch1 into next loop and repeat. If you want to be done at this point, fasten off and leave a long tail to sew onto your finished project. OR…

Basic Crochet Flower Tutorial | Classy Crochet

If you want to go big and keep going, repeat rows 3-4, increasing the ch loop to 5 and dc in each petal to 5. Usually at this point it’s big enough but you can always add another row for extreme flower awesomeness.

Some tips I’ve picked up over the years:

  • When I sew the flower on, I fasten around the loops of the edges of the petals of each row, but in the last row (with the largest petals) I also sew a tiny stitch into the middle of each petal.  This keeps the flower from curling up, and then it looks a lot smaller.
  • I prefer to leave the long tail for fastening at the beginning (before you ch4 into a loop) and work my way out when I fasten, but that’s a matter of preference.
  • If you do choose to attach the flower to a clip, depending on how big the flower to clip ratio is, I tend to attach the clip towards the ‘top’ of the flower in the back.  This way the flower doesn’t flop over and look very sad.
  • If you want to make it bigger, you can just increase the hook size.  I’ve gone all the way up to a K hook on the last row of petals and added a few extra dcs in each petal.

The quick and dirty typed out pattern:

Row 1: ch4, sl st to form a loop. *ch3, sl st into loop* repeat 5 times for a total of six ch3 loops. This forms the basis for your first row of petals.

Row 2: Sl st, ch1 into first ch3 loop. In each loop: hdc, dc, hdc, ch1, sl st. Sl st, ch1 into next loop and repeat.

Row 3: ch1, turn flower over. *Insert hook, sl st into middle of the back of the petal. Ch4.* Repeat * five times – 6 ch4 loops.

Row 4: Sl st, ch1 into first ch4 loop. In each loop: hdc, 3 dc, hdc, ch1, sl st. Sl st, ch1 into next loop and repeat. If you want to be done at this point, fasten off and leave a long tail to sew onto your finished project. OR…

Row 5: repeat rows 3-4, increasing the ch loop to 5 and dc in each petal to 5.

Free Crochet Pattern: Striped Earflap Hat

Hello friends!  For our first trick of the new Classy Crochet blog, I’m posting a free crochet hat pattern.  You can find it on Ravelry or just download it here.  This is my first published pattern, and I’m welcoming all feedback and comments.  Enjoy!

Crochet Striped Flower Earflap Hat Pattern

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And when you’re done, feel free to share your project on our Ravelry project gallery!